GMW



Reblogged from prepaidafrica
prepaidafrica:

Featured in the new book Afritecture: Building Social Change, this A-frame, timber-construction floating school was designed by Amsterdam- and Lagos-based studio NLÉ. It is shown anchored in the watery Makoko community of Lagos, Nigeria, a sprawling, Venice-like settlement on Lagos’s lagoon.
Afritecture Explores Africa’s Often Overlooked Architectural Landscape
Despite being the world’s second-largest and second-most-populous continent, Africa remains an outsider in the realm of architectural study, frequently passed over for other far-flung reaches (Asia and, recently, Oceania) or for the more familiar territory of Western Europe and North America. Enter Afritecture: Building Social Change (Hatje Cantz, $50)…
Read full article

prepaidafrica:

Featured in the new book Afritecture: Building Social Change, this A-frame, timber-construction floating school was designed by Amsterdam- and Lagos-based studio NLÉ. It is shown anchored in the watery Makoko community of Lagos, Nigeria, a sprawling, Venice-like settlement on Lagos’s lagoon.

Afritecture Explores Africa’s Often Overlooked Architectural Landscape

Despite being the world’s second-largest and second-most-populous continent, Africa remains an outsider in the realm of architectural study, frequently passed over for other far-flung reaches (Asia and, recently, Oceania) or for the more familiar territory of Western Europe and North America. Enter Afritecture: Building Social Change (Hatje Cantz, $50)…

Read full article

(via artsandideasmag)

Reblogged from lustik
Reblogged from lustik

lustik:

CORPUS FEMINA Réalisé @ekwc - Costumes en céramiques - Charlotte Cornaton - The European Ceramic Work Centre.

"My project is a triptych about femininity. It consists of three ceramic costumes
designed for performances. I turn myself into an object, idealizing myself
the way men have idealized women countless times before, in order to reclaim
my body. The skin armour costume contests the objectification of women
in contemporary society. Feelings and emotions are represented through
an organ costume that shows the heart, lungs, liver, intestines etc. Finally,
a skeleton costume signifies both a carpe diem and a memento mori”. - Charlotte Cornaton.

Reblogged from kingsleyifill

(Source: kingsleyifill, via sangbleu)

Reblogged from immovabletanuki
immovabletanuki:

Horishi: Horigorō II
Orochimaru by Tenbō no Masa

immovabletanuki:

Horishi: Horigorō II

Orochimaru by Tenbō no Masa

(via sangbleu)

Reblogged from allesandersen
allesandersen:

Leif Ørnelund, måleapparat, Meteorologisk institutt, 1953.
Oslo Museum, Byhistorisk samling, OB.Ø53/2275b.

allesandersen:

Leif Ørnelund, måleapparat, Meteorologisk institutt, 1953.

Oslo Museum, Byhistorisk samling, OB.Ø53/2275b.

Reblogged from punkysdilemma

punkysdilemma:

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly.” 

― Henry David Thoreau

Reblogged from soul-46

soul-46:

Pain, is the only thing i can feel right now, they gave their lives for our freedom… we will never forget you our angels, we will carry you in our hearts, forever! “Heaven’s Hundred”  that’s the way we call them!

Слава Небесній Сотні!

Слава Героям!

Reblogged from nigerianostalgia
nigerianostalgia:

Three children in Kano dressed in uniforms bought by their father during his last pilgrimage to Mecca. Kano. 1982.Vintage Nigeria

nigerianostalgia:

Three children in Kano dressed in uniforms bought by their father during his last pilgrimage to Mecca. Kano. 1982.
Vintage Nigeria

(via nigerianostalgia)

Reblogged from georgebeast-deactivated20131031